Print-Friendly
Bookmarks

Peristalsis

Intestinal motility

Peristalsis is a series of muscle contractions. These contractions occur in your digestive tract. Peristalsis is also seen in the tubes that connect the kidneys to the bladder.

Peristalsis is an automatic and important process. It moves:

  • Food through the digestive system.
  • Urine from the kidneys into the bladder
  • Bile from the gallbladder into the duodenum

Peristalsis is a normal function of the body. It can sometimes be felt in your belly (abdomen) as gas moves along.

 

References

Hall JE. General principles of gastrointestinal function - motility, nervous control, and blood circulation. In: Hall JE, ed. Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 63.

Pandolfino JE, Kahrilas PJ. Esophageal neuromuscular function and motility disorders. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 43.

Suchy FJ. Hepatobiliary function. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 46.

Weiss RM, Martin DT. Physiology and pharmacology of the renal pelvis and ureter. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 43.

BACK TO TOP

    • Digestive system

      Digestive system

      illustration

    • Ileus - X-ray of distended bowel and stomach

      Ileus - X-ray of distended bowel and stomach

      illustration

    • Ileus - X-ray of bowel distension

      Ileus - X-ray of bowel distension

      illustration

    • Peristalsis

      Peristalsis

      illustration

      • Digestive system

        Digestive system

        illustration

      • Ileus - X-ray of distended bowel and stomach

        Ileus - X-ray of distended bowel and stomach

        illustration

      • Ileus - X-ray of bowel distension

        Ileus - X-ray of bowel distension

        illustration

      • Peristalsis

        Peristalsis

        illustration

       

      Review Date: 6/28/2018

      Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

      The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
      adam.com

       
       
       

       

       

      A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.